10 of the Best Trees for Planting in New England
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10 of the Best Trees for Planting in New England

Trees are an important part of any yard as they define the outdoor space. The best trees for New England will be hardy and tolerate the cold and produce brilliant fall color or spring blooms. By planting native trees to the region, growers will not have to worry about extra watering and care for their tree.

With spring quickly approaching, gardening and other yard projects are on the minds of many a New England homeowner. While flowers, grasses and shrubs all add value and interest to a yard, the trees in one’s yard really define the outdoor space. If you have a yard that is barren of mature trees or you’re looking to replace a sickly tree that’s taking a highly visible spot in your yard, then plant trees as soon as possible. Trees take a long time to grow and the larger the tree your purchase, the more you’ll spend and sizeable trees for transplant can be very costly.

It’s important to research the type of trees you want in your yard and think about where they should be planted. Trees are most likely permanent fixtures in your yard and it’s a good idea to go for native trees that can handle the hard freezes of the region. This will ensure the trees thrive and will not need much extra watering or care.

Here are 10 of the best trees for planting in New England.

Best trees for fall foliage:

Tulip Poplar

This tree grows up to 6 feet per year and showcases bold, bright yellow and gold leaves each fall. The tree blooms yellowish buds in the spring and is very hardy as it can be grown up through planting zone nine.

Autumn Blaze Maple

The Autumn Blaze Maple is the fastest growing of the maple species and will showcase the brightest of reds in the fall. The foliage on this particular maple is award winning and the tree resists disease and insects.

October Glory Maple

This maple showcases both fire engine red and brilliant oranges in its leaves that peak in color each October. This tree is noted for the reliable foliage; meaning you’re guaranteed to get a show even over mild falls and winters.

Best trees for spring blooms:

The Dogwoods

Any variety of dogwoods will produce early, long lasting blooms each spring. Dogwoods come in white, red, purple and pink, however some species are prone to disease and pest infestation.

Eastern Redbud

This flowering tree guarantees incredible, pink blooms each spring and is very low maintenance. Growers say it will literally take root and thrive anywhere.

Royal Empress Tree

This tree is one of the fastest growing available; up to 12 fees per year! The Royal Empress likes the shade and is easy to maintain, producing fragrant, pink blooms each spring.

Must-have New England Tree:

Norway Spruce or Blue Spruce

These are two types of “Christmas” trees often found in New England yards. The Norway spruce is faster growing, but the blue variety has a nice bluish tint to its evergreen color. Either one looks festive and fun dressed in outdoor lights over the holidays.

Unique New England Tree:

The Cherry Weeping Willow has the shape and form of a regular willow, with long windswept branches. However, instead of green the branches are a stark, snowy white. This is the newest hybrid of willow and color is unexpected and striking.

Productive New England Tree:

The English Walnut will produce buckets of walnuts each season. The tree also provides lots of shade and is very fast growing.

Jessica Drew is a writer and editor who blogs about a variety of financial related topics including student loans, debt management, home improvement and homes for sale by owner.

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